The student news site of Clayton High School.
McMillian+has+been+passionate+about+physical+education+since+college.+Having+spent+the+last+eighteen+years+working+with+college+athletics%2C+he+has+been+wanting+to+shift+his+teaching+to+younger+students.+

Lily Kleinhenz

McMillian has been passionate about physical education since college. Having spent the last eighteen years working with college athletics, he has been wanting to shift his teaching to younger students.

Joshua McMillian

Recognized as a master strength and conditioning coach by the CSCCA (Collegiate Strength and Conditioning Coaches Association) and having previously worked at the University of Missouri-St. Louis (UMSL) for 10 years as Director of Sports Performance, Joshua McMillion, Clayton High School’s new Physical Education teacher, is set to replace former coach, Buddy Sodeman, who is now serving as Clayton High School’s assistant principal.
McMillian has been passionate about physical education since college. Having spent the last eighteen years working with college athletics, he has been wanting to shift his teaching to younger students. “I want to make as many positive impacts as I can with all the people I meet,” said McMillian.
During his time at UMSL, McMillian designed and implemented sport specific training programs to optimize speed, strength, power, agility, and work capacity for over 250 student-athletes. His passion for strength and weight training stems from being cut from his position as a shot putter and discus thrower on his high school track and field team in his sophomore year. This setback served as motivation and inspiration for him to improve. By his senior year, McMillian was all-state in shot put and earned a scholarship to throw in college. He strongly believes that “if you can dedicate yourself to something, you can achieve the goals that you have set for yourself.”

I want to make as many positive impacts as I can with all the people I meet

— Joshua McMillian

McMillian moves to CHS hoping to see strong effort and open mindedness displayed by students in his class, regardless of their fitness level. He especially aims to create a safe space, so kids can enjoy themselves and begin their lifelong pursuit in personal fitness, an essential according to McMillian. In addition to building relationships with his students, McMillian also looks forward to getting to know the Clayton faculty and staff.
“I had great physical education teachers in high school who taught me the value of being physically active,” said McMillian. “It is my hope to be that for the students I have at Clayton.”

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