The student news site of Clayton High School.
While+at+her+previous+schools%2C+Brown+led+many+different+diversity+and+affinity+groups.+She+also+participated+in+Sister-To-Sister%2C+The+African-American+Accelerated+Student+Program%2C+and+the+College+Planning+Program

Lily Kleinhenz

While at her previous schools, Brown led many different diversity and affinity groups. She also participated in Sister-To-Sister, The African-American Accelerated Student Program, and the College Planning Program

Chandra Brown

Chandra Brown was born and bred in St. Louis, Missouri. She attended Jennings Senior High School, where she played basketball, volleyball and track.

Brown matriculated to Lindenwood University on a basketball and volleyball scholarship However, after her freshman year she left volleyball to focus solely on basketball. After graduating from Lindenwood, Brown obtained a Master’s of Professional School Counseling. She later obtained her certification as a psych examiner before transferring to school counseling.

She began her career as a walk-in counselor at Jennings. Then she transferred to Trinity Catholic High School. After four years at Trinity Catholic High School, she then moved to Parkway School District. Finally, she joined the Clayton High School counseling team.

While at her previous schools, she led many different diversity and affinity groups. She also participated in Sister-To-Sister, The African-American Accelerated Student Program, and the College Planning Program. The common thread linking all of her varied interests is Brown’s innate desire to learn more. This ideology is what drives her to become a better person every day.

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